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Cannabis Might Reverse Heart Failure, University Of Hawaii Study Finds

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Cannabis Might Reverse Heart Failure, University of Hawaii Study Finds
Photo Credit: Collective Evolution

Cannabis could potentially slow and even reverse heart failure via TRPV1, a cannabinoid receptor. This is according to research led by a team at the University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM).  Alexander Stokes, a JABSOM assistant professor in cell and molecular biology, said “the potential medical benefits of using cannabis-based therapies for the treatment of heart disease are promising.”

TRPV1 is showing long-term effective reversal of heart failure when the substance is administered orally. The key here is orally, this doesn’t mean that you can smoke cannabis and it will be good for your heart, in fact, it may very well have a negative effect if you do that. “TRPV1 has primarily been studied as a pain receptor,” said Stokes. “The receptors are abundant in the heart, and we are excited to show that if we inhibit its function with oral doses of drugs, we can reverse some effects of heart failure.”

The findings were published in the journal Channels.

A Big Topic Right Now

The topic of medical marijuana is a big one right now, especially in Canada where it was recently legalized. For years, there’s been a negative stigma attached to the substance, and when one dives deep into the subject it’s quite easy to see why. Cannabis, often called marijuana, has potential to treat and possibly even cure a wide range of diseases, but because of prohibition, the studies examining the medicinal aspects of the herb have been very limited. This is very unfortunate, for a number of reasons, and also very suspicious.

If we look at cancer, for example, multiple studies have clearly shown its potential to completely destroy cancer cells, many in vitro studies have clearly demonstrated this potential, without question. They’re not hard to find and have been published in abundance. Here is a video of Dr. Christina Sanchez, a molecular biologist at Compultense University in Madrid, Spain, explaining how THC (the main psychoactive constituent of the cannabis plant) can completely kill cancer cells. THC is simply one constituent of cannabis. It has been shown to be effective for multiple diseases as well, while other diseases are better treated with CBD, another constituent within cannabis. This begs the question, why have there been no, or at least so few, clinical trials set up as a result?

This hasn’t stopped people taking matters into their own hands though. There are numerous examples all over the internet of people claiming that cannabis oil, for example, cured their cancer. But from a scientific perspective this isn’t evidence, it’s simply anecdotal and as a result of a lack of research we cannot officially say cannabis kills cancer. We can only say that it has tremendous potential and that a lot more research is needed.

Pharma vs Cannabis

When a pharmaceutical drug shows even less than half of the potential that marijuana has shown, clinical trials are set up right away. Just imagine if the same resources that are poured into conventional cancer treatments were given to medical marijuana’s potential to treat cancer, among a wide range of other diseases. If that were to happen, we would know much more. But the lack of research continues. Is it because if scientists were to discover what strain, method of delivery and all of the other factors that require more research that are needed to treat disease, cannabis could become an effective treatment for cancer? What would happen to conventional treatments? Would people have to pay for their treatment if it was disclosed how to, for example, make cannabis oil in the right way for a specific cancer? Maybe this has something to do with it?

Big pharma would lose billions. It’s definitely something to think about.

What’s happening right now with the legalization of marijuana is that components of it are allowed to be studied. It seems that drugs will be developed to synthesize certain components of the plant, and the drugs themselves can then be patented. This is how big pharma will ultimately make money off of medical marijuana.

The Challenge With Government Control Of Cannabis

It’s great to see people with Parkinson’s, Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Epilepsy, cancer and more have tremendous success with medical marijuana. What’s unfortunate is that mainstream medical marijuana will be in the hands of big pharma, it already is. We will not know how it’s grown, how it’s been manipulated, and what’s been changed. It’s simply being used for profit, because at the end of the day that’s what it’s all about in our current infrastructure. We have a sick care industry, not a health care industry.

A free, open and caring society, a health care industry that truly cares about health could use multiple natural substances to completely wipe out the need for any pharmaceutical drug. There are massive amounts of foods, herbs and plants that, if studied in full, could completely eliminate our dependence on the corporation

“The medical profession is being bought by the pharmaceutical industry, not only in terms of the practice of medicine, but also in terms of teaching and research. The academic institutions of this country are allowing themselves to be the paid agents of the pharmaceutical industry. I think it’s disgraceful.”

– Arnold Seymour Relman (1923-2014), Harvard professor of medicine and former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Medical Journal  (source)

Important Thoughts To Consider About Cannabis

The other side of the coin is that heavy cannabis use, although not lethal, can be dangerous and potentially damaging to young brains that are not fully developed, and perhaps to those who use it on a regular basis in ways we do not yet understand.

It’s not as harmful as alcohol abuse or smoking cigarettes, but there is still a lot that we don’t know. Legalization in Canada at least have led to the idea that it’s completely safe and beneficial for everybody. This is also, most likely, not true.  We need to get past the idea that it’s something healthy for everybody, and even healthy to smoke cannabis on a regular basis. But when it comes to the medicinal aspects of cannabis, for several diseases, there is a very serious discussion to be had here as it’s again, already helping many people around the world with their cancer, with their epilepsy, etc.

With many people losing trust in the medical industry, it’s easy to see why they are turning to growing their own cannabis, testing doses, and methods of delivery, etc. For some, it’s a shot in the dark but worth a try.

We are not advocating that it’s healthy to use cannabis recreationally and that it will not have any negative effects, we are simply stating that it’s a head scratcher how such a potent medical plant that clearly has multiple medical applications has been ignored and prohibited from research and professionally treating many diseases with it.

This article (Cannabis Might Reverse Heart Failure, University Of Hawaii Study Finds) was originally created and published by Arjun Walia for Collective Evolution and is published here under a Creative Commons license

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Weeds Growing In Poor Urban Areas More Nutritious Than Grocery Store Produce

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Photo Credit: Pexels

Markab AlgediGuest Writer

In August, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley published their findings that wild green “weeds” growing in abundance in the poor, urban areas of San Francisco, California contain more nutrition than grocery store produce, even despite the drought in California.

About nine city blocks worth of wild greens were collected from three separate areas by the researchers, led by Philip Stark. The neighborhoods were described as “disadvantaged neighbourhoods surrounded by busy roads and industrial zones.”

According to Cosmos“The areas, classified as “urban food deserts”, are more than one to one-and-a-half kilometres from the nearest shop that sells fresh produce. Six different species were tested for nutrition content: chickweed (Stellaria media), dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), dock (Rumex crispus), mallow (Malva sylvestris), nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) and oxalis (Oxalis pescaprae). All compared favourably to kale – arguably one of the most nutritious domesticated greens – for several nutrients.”

Photo Credit: Cosmos
Photo Credit: Cosmos

These wild green plants offered more vitamin A, protein, iron, vitamin K, dietary fibre, and generally more energy than the grocery store greens, while the vitamin C content of grocery store Kale did surpass the content of the wild greens. However, the researchers suggested that other greens such as wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) or wild mustard (Hirschfeldia incana) may surpass the vitamin C content of Kale.

The researchers have officially documented 52 distinct species of green leaves in the streets of San Francisco. In abundance, wild greens can be found which include fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), cat’s ear (Hypochaeris radicata) plantain (Plantago lanceolate), wild onions (Allium spp), wild lettuce (Lactuca ludoviciana) and sow thistle (Sonchus oleraceus).

“Even during this low-production period, almost every address in all three study areas had several servings of several different species, suggesting that wild edible greens are a reliable source of nutrition all year round,” wrote the team.

Now another thing people should definitely factor in is the possible presence of environmental pollution in these city greens.

They did address that in a satisfying way, as according to one article“After rinsing in water, the plants had no detectable levels of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or heavy metals – all toxic substances that might have been expected in local environments.”

San Francisco, California in particular is known to be contaminated with radiation and heavy metals in some places, like Bayview or Hunter’s Point, where the US Navy once performed experiments with radiation.

Falsified soil tests were exposed when plans to build on top of still toxic sites in Hunter’s Point, San Francisco made headlines nearly a year ago.

However, those very same neighbourhoods of Bayview and Hunter’s Point have respectable community gardeners, and markets. According to one article specifically about the exchange of home-grown produce in Bayview:

“Farmers from seven community gardens in the Bayview District have joined forces to bring the first “Growers Market” into the neighbourhood, in an effort to address food insecurity and promote healthy eating among its residents.

Unlike most traditional farmers’ markets, all fresh produce and fruit for sale at the Bayview Grower’s market, which was launched at the Florence Fang Community Garden earlier this year, is hyper-locally sourced — grown in the Bayview to feed the neighborhood’s residents.”

Photo Credit: Cosmos

If produce is grown in Hunter’s Point or Bayview where radiation from the former US Navy installation on the peninsula may still be present, people should definitely test for that.

However, the notion of home-grown vegetables and nutritious greens grown in the city is extremely positive. These people deserve the utmost respect and support, in the eyes of any person who believes in community and self-sufficiency.

About the Author

This article (Weeds Growing in Poor Urban Areas More Nutritious than Grocery Store Produce) was created by The Mind Unleashed and is re-posted here with permission. It can be re-shared with attribution but MUST include link to homepage, bio, intact links and this message.  

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Why A Walnut Resembles The Brain It Nourishes

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Photo Credit: Pexels

Sayer Ji, GreenMedinfo

Nothing could be more beautiful or poetic than when a healing food actually looks like the organ system it nourishes and heals in the body.

While commonly viewed as mere coincidence or an act of extraordinary randomness, it is difficult for me to acknowledge the exquisite design of the walnut, whose eerily skull-like shell encompasses the fatty-acid rich, bihemispheric “brain” of the nut, without opening myself to the possibility that mother nature wove metaphor, meaning, and a high degree of co-evolutionary non-arbitrariness into the natural order of things. Walnuts are well known to have a disproportionately higher amount of the very fatty acids, specifically the EPA/DHA omega 3 fatty acid substrate alpha linolenic acid that the brain requires for optimal health. Moreover, walnuts contain well-known neuroprotective compounds, such as gallic acidvitamin E isomers, melatonin, folate, and polyphenols. Coincidence, or mother nature providing a clue so obvious we would have to be nuts (or nut deficient) in order to overlook it?

Or, consider the remarkable pomegranate fruit, prized the world over as a regenerative, fertility and prosperity enhancing food of deep cultural and mythological significance. Amazingly, pomegranate not only looks like the mammalian ovary but is literally the fruiting ovary of the pomegranate plant, and which produces some of the very same hormones (e.g. estrone and testosterone) that normally only animals produce, and which can even replace their function in the ovariectomy-induced experimental model of menopause.

In these examples, we see reflected a phenomenon once described as part of the “doctrine of signatures,” a concept that goes back at least 500 years around the time of Parceleus (1491–1541), who stated:  “Nature marks each growth … according to its curative benefit.”  While this concept was sometimes taken too literally in the ancient world, with superficial resemblances between plants and human organs often being mistaken as having significant medical value, indubitably, there is still deep wisdom embedded in ancient medical texts, concepts, and practices.

At GreenMedInfo.com, we focus on supporting our intuitive faculties and direct experiences (the so-called N-of-1 which is the phenomological ground of all truth) in the realm of natural medicine with peer-reviewed scientific research, and this includes validating some of the more “poetical” concepts like the “doctrine of signatures” that the majority of modern medical professionals have left behind as “magical thinking”, or were never exposed to in their training. I believe we are nearing a golden age of mutual validation, where the ancient and new worlds meet to confirm one another, ultimately amplifying the awareness that natural healing, and self-healing is the only sane path forward worth taking when it comes to, at least, non-emergency health care.

Pomegranate: The Ovary, Heart, And Blood Healing Food

Pomegranate is an exceptional example of a food that participates in the extraordinary doctrine of signatures, because it both resembles and heals multiple organ systems. Not only is it a plant ovary that supports, nourishes and heals the ovaries of animals, but it looks like a heart and “bleeds” an amazing, astringent juice that anyone who has tasted it knows leaves the mouth feeling exceptionally clean. The oral cavity happens to be lined with the very same epithelial tissue that lines the inside of the blood vessels (endothelium). The same cleansing effect, that you taste and feel in your mouth, also occurs in your arteries, which is why pomegranate has been clinically proven to reverse arterial plaque buildup within just months of consumption. Can you only imagine what would happen if the millions on statin drugs who are obtaining no cardiovascular benefits consumed pomegranate instead? If food were used as medicine we might actually accomplish a deceleration, and perhaps even regression, of the ever-expanding global heart disease epidemic.

Pomegranate’s blood-like juice has been clinically studied to increase the health and vitality of our blood. A 2014 study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism titled, “Effects of pomegranate extract on blood flow and running time to exhaustion,” found that acute ingestion of pomegranate extract 30 min before exercise enhanced vessel diameter and blood flow and delayed fatigue during exercise. The pomegranate group noted a significant increase in post-exertion vitality, as well.

I found this study particularly interesting because I have noticed after consuming pomegranate juice the same sensation of increased blood flow. I was not certain, until reading this study, if this was something I was imagining or if it was possible within one dose of pomegranate to experience significance differences in blood flow.  Remarkably, another “blood-like” liquid, beet juice, has also been found to have significant blood supportive properties. In one recent study, a single dose of beet juice resulted in improved cognition within 90 minutes, and which researchers attributed to its ability to positively modulate the blood flow dynamics (haemodynamic response) in the frontal cortex. One of the mechanisms identified is the presence within beet juice of nitrates, which produce a blood vessel dilating effect.

For those looking for more information on the doctrine of signatures, the herbalist Mathew Wood provides salient insight in an article on the topic under the subheading “the Forces of Nature and the Creation of Signatures”:

“Every plant represents a finely honed response to environmental stress – the exact same stress that human beings must contend with in order to stay healthy. The wide array of chemical compounds in the plant, as well as its shape, color and environmental niche all represent adaptations to stress. The plant has been molded in response to stress. There is no room for extra chemicals or colors or extravagant shapes.

It is a survivor and what it can do for itself it can convey to us as a medicine. The philosopher Rudolf Steiner pointed out that the same forces which cause disease in the human frame cause the contortion of the plant. Thus, the “contortions” or shapes and colors, not to mention the environmental niche in which the plant lives, are “signatures” picturing the stresses and diseases to which plant is remedial.

There is also a deeper lesson. The doctrine of signatures teaches us to view disease and remedy in a “characterological” sense, or as specific patterns or identity patterns formed in response to stress. Each possesses an inherent logic and intelligence all their own. These responses produce patterns or “signatures” which we must learn to read in plant and person alike.”

For an even deeper scientific explanation for how plants and animals co-evolved, learning how to survive and/or thrive together by developing certain phytochemical co-dependencies, read the remarkable article on the topic titled, “Xenohormesis: health benefits from an eon of plant stress response evolution.”

For more information on food-organ resemblance, read our article: 3 Foods That Look Like the Organ They Heal, as well as the deeper food philosophy of Sayer Ji: Leonardo da Vinci & The New Biology.

About the Author

Sayer Ji is founder of Greenmedinfo.com, a reviewer at the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine, Co-founder and CEO of Systome Biomed, Vice Chairman of the Board of the National Health Federation, Steering Committee Member of the Global Non-GMO Foundation.

**© [06/12/19] GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo? Sign up for the newsletter here http://www.greenmedinfo.com/greenmed/newsletter.**

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of Collective Spark or its staff.

This article (Why Walnut Resembles the Brain It Nourishes) was originally published at GreenMedinfo and is re-posted here with permission.

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10 Signs You Are Deficient In Magnesium (And What To Do About It)

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Photo Credit: Truth Theory

Mandy Froelich, Truth Theory

Did you know? A whopping 90% of humans are estimated to be deficient in magnesium. Considering the mineral is responsible for over 300 biochemical reactions in the body, as well as impacts blood pressure, metabolism, and immune function, obtaining adequate stores of the nutrient is vital.

What, Exactly, Is Magnesium? 

Magnesium is a mineral found in the Earth, sea, plants, animals, and humans. The majority (60%) of magnesium is found in your bones, while the rest is in your muscles, soft tissues, and fluids. Every cell in your body needs magnesium to function. In fact, one of magnesium’s main roles is acting as a cofactor or “helper molecule” in the biochemical reactions performed by enzymes, reports Healthline.

Magnesium is involved in energy creation, protein formation, gene maintenance, muscle movements, and nervous system regulation. Therefore, obtaining adequate amounts of magnesium should be on everyone’s priority list.

Why Is Magnesium Deficiency So Widespread?

Good question, as there are several reasons.

  • Depleted soil conditions mean that plants (and animals that are fed from those plants) are lower in magnesium.
  • The use of chemicals, such as fluoride and chlorine, bind to magnesium, making the water supply low in the mineral, as well.
  • Common substances — such as sugar and caffeine — deplete the body’s magnesium levels.
  • Stress also taxes the endocrine system, depleting levels of magnesium

Folks who live near the ocean (good source of magnesium), eat foods grown in magnesium-rich soil, and drink magnesium-rich water don’t necessarily have to worry about being deficient. However, that doesn’t apply to the majority of people living on Earth.

You Might Be Deficient In Magnesium If…

As Wellness Mama points out, risk factors for low magnesium vary. However, the following are clues that you might need more magnesium:

  1. You’re addicted to sugar
  2. You take calcium supplements
  3. You drink soda and other sugar-filled drinks
  4. You suspect or have been diagnosed with celiac disease or other digestive disorders (like Crohn’s disease)
  5. You consume a lot of processed food and conventional dairy
  6. You have a water softener or drink city water
  7. You have Type 2 diabetes
  8. You avoid green vegetables, leafy greens, and raw, unprocessed nuts and seeds
  9. You are an older adult or take prescription medications
  10. You eat food grown in depleted soils (the majority of the population)
10 Symptoms Of Magnesium Deficiency

Some experts claim that magnesium deficiency is the single largest health problem in our world today. Following are symptoms that you may be experiencing a deficiency of the vital mineral.

  1. Calcification of the arteries, Unfortunately, this is one of the first symptoms to appear, as well as one of the most serious. Calcification of the arteries can occur from low magnesium levels. As a result, one’s preposition to develop coronary problems, like heart attacks, heart failure, and heart disease, is increased. Magnesium’s ability to prevent over-calcification is one reason why the Framingham Health Study found that consuming enough magnesium lowers the risk of coronary heart disease. Believe it or not, half of all heart attack patients received injections of magnesium chloride to help stop the blood clotting and calcification.
  2. Muscle Spasming & Cramping This is one of the most notable symptoms of being deficient in magnesium. Just as calcification can cause stiffening of the arteries, it can cause stiffening of muscle tissue, as well. This can result in awful cramps and spasms. Fortunately, consuming enough magnesium (or supplementing the nutrient) can reduce the incidence of this symptom.
  3. Anxiety & Depression Anxiety and depression affect millions of people. Could something as simple as magnesium helps to reduce the blues? Research suggests “yes.”Psychology Today explains one possible reason: “Magnesium hangs out in the synapse between two neurons along with calcium and glutamate. If you recall, calcium and glutamate are excitatory, and in excess, toxic (link is external). They activate the NMDA receptor. Magnesium can sit on the NMDA receptor without activating it, like a guard at the gate. Therefore, if we are deficient in magnesium, there’s no guard. Calcium and glutamate can activate the receptor-like there is no tomorrow. In the long term, this damages the neurons, eventually leading to cell death. In the brain, that is not an easy situation to reverse or remedy.”
  4. Hormone Imbalances If you experience crazy “ups” and “downs” before or after your period, it’s likely your body is deficient in magnesium. The higher the estrogen or progesterone levels in a woman’s body, the lower the magnesium. This is also why pregnant women experience more leg crampsAccording to Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of the book The Magnesium Miracle, muscle cramps related to the menstrual cycle can also be related to magnesium levels. She recommends women with bad PMS and cramps take magnesium early in their cycles before the symptoms begin.
  5. High Blood Pressure / Hypertension A Harvard study with over 70,000 people found that those with the highest magnesium intake had the healthiest blood pressure numbers. A follow-up meta-analysis of available studies showed a dose-dependent reduction of blood pressure with magnesium supplementation. That’s not all — a University of Minnesota study found that the risk for hypertension was 70% lower in women with adequate/high magnesium levels.
  6. Pregnancy Discomfort Similar to hormone problems, low magnesium levels can adversely affect pregnancy health and mood. Some women report less morning sickness during pregnancy when supplementing with transdermal magnesium. Magnesium can also reduce hypertension and muscle cramps during pregnancy. Supplementation can also help to ward off preterm labour and alleviate headaches.
  7. Low Energy You may remember from biology class that magnesium is required in the reactions that create ATP energy in cells. As Wellness Mama summarizes, ATP or adenosine triphosphate is the main source of energy in the cells. To be active, it must bind to a magnesium ion. In other words, without magnesium, you literally won’t have energy on a cellular level. This can show up as fatigue, low energy, lack of drive, and other problems.
  8. Bone Health Most people regard calcium as the most important mineral for healthy bones. While it is important, magnesium may even be more so! In cases of magnesium deficiency, the bone suffers in the following ways:
    1. Vitamin D Absorption Magnesium is essential for vitamin D to turn on calcium absorption. That’s why magnesium supplementation may be necessary when taking vitamin D (or else levels may become even more depleted).
    1. Proper Calcium Use Magnesium is required to stimulate the hormone calcitonin which draws calcium out of the muscles and tissues and into the bones. This helps explain why magnesium helps lower the risk of osteoporosis, arthritis, kidney stones, and heart attack.
  9. Sleep Problems Melatonin, chamomile, and lavender are all helpful aids to snooze peacefully. However, magnesium is the ultimate relaxation mineral, as Dr. Mark Hyman says. Magnesium helps to relax the body and the mind, which both contribute to restful sleep. Furthermore, magnesium is required for the proper function of the GABA receptors in the brain. GABA is the neurotransmitter that allows the brain to transition to a restful state.
  10. Other Symptoms A number of vitamins and minerals work synergistically and magnesium tops the list. It is needed for the proper utilization of calcium, potassium, vitamin K, vitamin D, and other nutrients. By using magnesium externally or transdermally (“across the skin”), the body can absorb what it needs without absorbing too much.
The Best Ways To Boost Your Magnesium Levels 

Believe it or not, magnesium deficiency is actually quite simple for the body to resolve with the right form of magnesium. Most of the supplements on the market are pills or solutions taken internally. Though these can be effective, they can also cause digestive disturbances or stress the kidney (definitely not ideal during pregnancy). Furthermore, experts estimate that magnesium absorption in the digestive system ranges from 20-55%, depending on the source. That means more than half of the magnesium leaves the body as waste.

Research currently shows that a combination of oral magnesium (in the right form) and topical magnesium is ideal for boosting low levels. A slow-release option can have an absorption rate up to 85%. This one, for example, has been formulated to decrease digestive distress. It also contains B vitamins.

Foods Abundant In Magnesium

If supplements aren’t for you — no worries! There are plenty of nutrient-dense foods that are rich sources of magnesium. The following contain high levels of the anti-stress mineral:

  • Dark chocolate
  • Nuts and seeds (specifically pumpkin seeds)
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Leafy greens (kale, spinach, and chard)
  • Wild-caught fish
  • Himalayan pink sea salt
  • Sea vegetables
  • Sprouts
  • Grass-fed dairy (though controversial in certain dietary camps)

For recipe ideas, visit Life in Bloom.

About the Author

Mandy Froelich is an RHN, plant-based chef, journalist, Reiki master therapist, world traveller and enthusiast of everything to do with animal rights, sustainability, cannabis and conscious living. She share healthy recipes on my blog Life in Bloom.

Summary

Nearly everyone is magnesium deficient. However, it is a relatively simple deficiency to correct — if you take action to eat more magnesium-rich foods or supplements. If you experience any of the symptoms above, consult with your doctor and/or receive a blood panel to determine if you are deficient. At the very least, consuming more magnesium-rich foods will reduce your chances of experiencing the hardening of the arteries, enhance your sleep, and help balance your mood.

Sources:
  1. Aarhus University. (2013, October 4). Research reveals the mechanism of the sodium-potassium pump. ScienceDaily.
  2. Shea MK, Holden RM. Vitamin K status and vascular calcification: evidence from observational and clinical studies. Adv Nutr. 2012;3(2):158-65.
  3. Hruby A et al., Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014;7(1):59-69.
  4. Sun Ha Jee, et al., The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. American Journal of Hypertension 2012;15(8):691–696.
  5. Zofková I, Kancheva RL. The relationship between magnesium and calciotropic hormones. Magnes Res. 1995;8(1):77-84.
  6. Rude RK, Olerich M. Magnesium deficiency: possible role in osteoporosis associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Osteoporos Int. 1996;6(6):453-61.
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Science Confirms Turmeric Is As Effective As 14 Drugs

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Sayer Ji, Green Med Info

Turmeric is one the most thoroughly researched plants in existence today.  Its medicinal properties and components (primarily curcumin) have been the subject of over 5600 peer-reviewed and published biomedical studies. In fact, our five-year long research project on this sacred plant has revealed over 600 potential preventive and therapeutic applications, as well as 175 distinct beneficial physiological effects. This entire database of 1,585 ncbi-hyperlinked turmeric abstracts can be downloaded as a PDF at our Downloadable Turmeric Document page, and acquired either as a retail item or with 200 GMI-tokens, for those of you who are already are members and receive them automatically each month.

Given the sheer density of research performed on this remarkable spice, it is no wonder that a growing number of studies have concluded that it compares favourably to a variety of conventional medications, including:

  • Lipitor/Atorvastatin(cholesterol medication): A 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R & D found that a standardized preparation of curcuminoids from Turmeric compared favourably to the drug atorvastatin (trade name Lipitor) on endothelial dysfunction, the underlying pathology of the blood vessels that drives atherosclerosis, in association with reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic patients. [i]  [For addition curcumin and ‘high cholesterol’ research – 8 abstracts]
  • Corticosteroids (steroid medications): A 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that the primary polyphenol in turmeric, the saffron collared pigment known as curcumin, compared favourably to steroids in the management of chronic anterior uveitis, an inflammatory eye disease.[ii]  A 2008 study published in Critical Care Medicine found that curcumin compared favourably to the corticosteroid drug dexamethasone in the animal model as an alternative therapy for protecting lung transplantation-associated injury by down-regulating inflammatory genes.[iii] An earlier 2003 study published in Cancer Letters found the same drug also compared favourably to dexamethasone in a lung ischaemia-repurfusion injury model.[iv]  [for additional curcumin and inflammation research – 52 abstracts]
  • Prozac/Fluoxetine & Imipramine  (antidepressants): A 2011 study published in the journal Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica found that curcumin compared favourably to both drugs in reducing depressive behavior in an animal model.[v] [for additional curcumin and depression research – 5 abstracts]
  • Aspirin (blood thinner): A 1986 in vitro and ex vivo study published in the journal Arzneimittel for schung found that curcumin has anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects compared to aspirin, indicating it may have value in patients prone to vascular thrombosis and requiring anti-arthritis therapy.[vi]  [for additional curcumin and anti-platelet research]
  • Anti-inflammatory Drugs: A 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene found that curcumin (as well as resveratrol) were effective alternatives to the drugs aspirin, ibuprofen, sulindac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, dexamethasone, celecoxib, and tamoxifen in exerting anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activity against tumour cells.[vii] [for additional curcumin and anti-proliferative research – 15 abstracts]
  • Oxaliplatin (chemotherapy drug): A 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer found that curcumin compares favourably with oxaliplatin as an antiproliferative agenet in colorectal cell lines.[viii] [for additional curcumin and colorectal cancer research – 52 abstracts]
  • Metformin (diabetes drug): A 2009 study published in the journal Biochemitry and Biophysical Research Community explored how curcumin might be valuable in treating diabetes, finding that it activates AMPK (which increases glucose uptake) and suppresses gluconeogenic gene expression  (which suppresses glucose production in the liver) in hepatoma cells. Interestingly, they found curcumin to be 500 times to 100,000 times (in the form known as tetrahydrocurcuminoids(THC)) more potent than metformin in activating AMPK and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). [ix]

Another way in which turmeric and its components reveal their remarkable therapeutic properties is in research on drug resistant- and multi-drug resistant cancers.  We have two sections on our site dedicated to researching natural and integrative therapies on these topics, and while there are dozens of substances with demonstrable efficacy against these chemotherapy- and radiation-resistant cancers, curcumin tops both lists:

Cancers: Drug Resistant

Cancers: Multi-Drug Resistant

We have found no less than 54 studies indicating that curcumin can induce cell death or sensitize drug-resistant cancer cell lines to conventional treatment.[x]

We have identified 27 studies on curcumin’s ability to either induce cell death or sensitize multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines to conventional treatment.[xi]

Considering how strong a track record turmeric (curcumin) has, having been used as both food and medicine in a wide range of cultures, for thousands of years, a strong argument can be made for using curcumin as a drug alternative or adjuvant in cancer treatment.

Or, better yet, use certified organic (non-irradiated) turmeric in lower culinary doses on a daily basis so that heroic doses won’t be necessary later in life after a serious disease sets in.  Nourishing yourself, rather than self-medicating with ‘nutraceuticals,’ should be the goal of a healthy diet.  [learn more at Sayer Ji’s new collaborative project EATomology]

About the Author

Sayer Ji is an author, researcher, lecturer, and advisory board member of the National Health Federation.

He founded Greenmedinfo.com in 2008 in order to provide the world an open access, evidence-based resource supporting natural and integrative modalities. It is internationally recognized as the largest and most widely referenced health resource of its kind.

Resources

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of Collective Spark or its staff.

GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC. Want to learn more from GreenMedInfo?

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